March 2, 2016 wecantgoforthat

EveryMove Case Study

Hero

 

OVERVIEW

EveryMove is an app that converts physical activity into real world rewards.  The intent of the app is to be your hub for working out, celebrating fitness goals, tracking all of your fitness data and activities, and encouraging your friends.  There are two methods to get your fitness data into EveryMove. One is connecting an app or fitness tracker and syncing your data, the other is manually entering your activity via the mobile app or website.  My task was to create a seamless easy to understand user experience for active people to enter their physical activity.

The average use case is that a user just completed an activity like working out or a run and wanted to quickly enter what activity they did, how long they did the activity and any notable details about that activity.   The person would most likely be using their mobile phone and taking rest during this process and likely be at the gym or outside.


CHALLENGES

THE PRIMARY CHALLENGE I WAS FACED WAS A NUMBER OF OPTIONS FOR THIS FEATURE AND SUB-OPTIONS THAT CAN BE ENTERED.  IT WAS A TOO MUCH INFORMATION AND THERE WEREN’T MANY OPTIONS WE COULD CUT FOR THE SAKE OF A BETTER USER EXPERIENCE.  THE SPECIAL SAUCE OF EVERYMOVE IS THAT IT WANTS TO SUPPORT AS MANY ACTIVITIES AS POSSIBLE.

 

FOR EXAMPLE, IF A USER WANTS TO LOG A RUN THEY WOULD NEED TO SET:

  • what type of running (jogging, 5k, treadmill, etc)
  • the time and date
  • the duration of their run
  • the distance of their run
  • who they did it with
  • where they did it
  • any notes they would like to share about the run
  • whether this post would be private or public
  • and if they would like to share on facebook and/or twitter


OLD ADD AN ACTIVITY SCREENS

My first reaction was there were simply too many options for a single screen.  When you present too many options to a user many users simply shut down and abandon the action, rather than deal with the cognitive load of trying to figure out all the inputs available on this screen. The idea of choice paradox that when shoppers choose a laundry detergent in the grocery aisle the stores purposely only give the user a limited amount of options because if you give a user too many choices they often quit and move on to something else.

addacitivty1

 

 


INSPIRATION

FACEBOOK’S PAPER IOS APP

I’m firm believer there is no shame in studying the competition and see how they solve problems and then applying your own solution to it. At the time, I was enamored withFacebook’s newly released app of Paper.  Paper was a twist on the facebook experience to make you focus on one to three stories at one time, rather than a never-ending vertical feed.  It reminded me of a combination parts of facebook and Flipboard.  It also had some pretty nifty user based actions like swiping down to close a page.  I paid close attention to their “Adding a Status Update” screen because it closely mirrored the business goals of the “Add an Activity” flow I was tasked to do.

paper0

 


WIRES

PEOPLE WANT TO DO ONE THING AT A TIME, AND THEY WANT TO BE GUIDED THROUGH THE FLOW AS OPPOSED TO BEING PROMPTED WITH MULTIPLE DECISION POINTS AT EVERY STEP.

Some of the key takeaways from the Facebook Paper app was to have each screen have a smaller focus on one or two tasks and then put them into a quick and easy flow.   This reduces the cognitive load of too many options and also solves the problem of different activities having different metrics that needed to be tracked.  This is often something hard to convey in a flow.  I’ve definitely had product managers say it looks like to many screens, but when they see a working prototype or build they got what I was trying to achieve right away.  Entering an activity could be broken down into two categories: Story/narrative and fact. Namely, what did you do and then how did it make you feel?

meeting

Examples:

A: The user had a photo they wanted to share with their friends on EveryMove (Story/narrative)
C: The user had just finished the gym and wanted to see if they got an active day for their workout (fact)In both examples, we would want to give them the opportunity to enter either an activity or a story about the activity, so they start in A and end in B, or start in C and end in B. So the start of any entry is what the user wanted to enter in the moment, and the end is an opportunity to add more.

vin

 

With this in mind, I moved on to create the first flow.

HERE ARE MY WIRES FOR ADD AN ACTIVITY V1

AddActivity_wires_full2

My initial design meeting went very well.  Rather than putting everything in one screen the flow was reworked to be:
Choose Activity > Duration > Distance >  Activity Summary with options for:
  •  Tagging friends
  •  Changing the date time (because we found most users enter the activity the same time they were doing it)
  •  Setting location
  •  Setting privacy
Through user research and taking a dive into the metrics we found out activityduration, and distance where the primary actions and tagging,setting the datelocation, and privacy where lesser used secondary actions.  Also, the “Activity Summary screen” served as an anchor for the user to add details, or if they were in a hurry they could enter the minimum amount of details and still post the activity.
In the previous version of the app there was a feature of marking an activity as a favorite.  What I found out  was it was a hardly used feature and that most of our users only did the about 4-5 activities that they repeated each week.  My solution was to scrap the idea of favorites and for the app to simply remember your most popular 5 activities and show those in the choose activity screen and show this first in a searchable list of all activities.


DESIGN

Through the design process we kept coming back to the fact that our brand wanted to be more human and promote a conversation between users.   We were already seeing a poor engagement with users after they posted their activity.  How can we make the people’s workout more engaging?  If people weren’t commenting or liking a post that read “Jim ran for 4.2 miles in 20 mins” what would make me personally give someone a word or encouragement, or ask a question about their post?

 

addactivity

 This come what I called the Once More with Feeling Flow where we isolate a lesser used feature of making a note.  After an activity is entered we simply ask How did it go? .
  • Did you break your own record ?
  • Was it a cake walk?
  • Do you feel like a truck hit you?
The key was adding context to the activity.  If you went on a hike I am more likely to comment on a post that said  “I went on a hike and forgot to pack dry socks” than the robotic post of “Joe went on a hike for 10miles for 2hrs at 4000ft elevation”.  We began to refer to these new types of posts, Posts with personality.  Adding a human element to the activities, added a human factor, and gave the post an interesting nugget to interact with.

feeling


RESULTS

  •  About a 10% growth in signups per day on average since the redesign
  • App rating went from 2.5 to 4.5 stars
  •  A huge improvement on mobile core tasks from about 50% to about 70%. Core tasks include “adding an activity”, “connecting an app or device”, and “inviting friends to try out the app”
  • Engagement went up by 64%. Comments and likes went up because the post changed from “Jim ran for 4 Miles today” to “I should have packed dry socks today“.  Requiring the user add a personalized human touch to their workout made it easier for other users to start a conversation.